Posts Tagged ‘HID relay harness’

Are you wondering how to use the HID Harness with your V-HIDS headlight conversion kit? I want to cover a cool feature that comes standard with every “single beam” V-HIDS kit we offer. This feature allows for quick plug-n-play installation of the HID Harness and other accessories your car may need.

H11 HID bulb and Input Adapter Jumper

The feature that I am talking about is what I refer to as the “Input Adapter Jumper”. The picture to the right shows the jumper wires as they come in the kit, attached to the HID bulb. They are routed through a rubber grommet with the HID bulbs wiring. This is so you can route them into your headlight housing and keep a water tight seal if you have sealed-back headlights. This input adapter jumper has as a male 9006 connector on one end and the specific end of the bulb type of the kit on the other end, this one happens to be an H11. This allows for a direct connection from your cars headlight socket to the input connector of the HID harness.

Connection of the Adapter to the HID Harness

Input Connector of the HID Harness

The HID Harness has a single input connector shown here. It is a female 9006 plug. This is where you connect the adapter to the HID Harness. Here is another bonus to this setup. If your car is equipped with a warning light that indicates you have a burnt out headlight and you need to install an inline capacitor or inline resistor you’re in luck. These parts come with male and female 9006 connectors too. So if you need any additional parts to get your V-HIDS kit working they will plug right into this setup without any modification to your cars wiring harness.

9006_INLINE_RES INLINE_CAP_ADAPT 9006_DRL_MODULE

9006_INLINE_RES INLINE_CAP_ADAPT 9006_DRL_MODULE

Here we see the 9006_INLINE_RES,   INLINE_CAP_ADAPT and the 9006_DRL_MODULE. Each one is designed for different applications. I will be covering these applications in the future. In the following pictures you can see how easy it is to install them inline. Using the 9006 style connectors allows adding these parts to this setup to be quick and easy. A complete wiring schematic for the HID_HARNESS is at the bottom of the page too.

9006_INLINE_RES Installed

If you do have any application questions feel free to ask. You can email me direct at: tech@v-leds.com

INLINE_CAP_ADAPT Installed

Thanks for reading, James the tech@v-leds.com

Here are links to other articles that contain additional information on some of these products:

HID_HARNESS

DRL_MODULES

9006_DRL_MODULE Installed

Installation Diagram For HID_HARNESS

Installation Diagram For HID_HARNESS

Not too many ask this question but I seem to remind a lot of people that they should re-aim their headlights after they install an HID kit. Aiming your lights may seem like a difficult task, but is relatively simple once you understand how to do it. There are a few different resources that I have found useful online and they all follow the same procedure. We will cover this procedure shortly, but first I want to help you understand why this should be taken into consideration.

The first reason that I suggest re-aiming your lights is for safety. Properly adjusted headlights keep you from blinding oncoming traffic. The halogen bulbs you just replaced are about 1/3 as bright as the HID kit you just installed. Your lights may have been out of alignment before, but they were dimmer and it may have not been that noticeable. (if you had to remove your headlight housings during installation you will definitely need to adjust the height and direction of your headlights) But now that you have HIDs installed you are going to notice a difference, and so is everyone else on the road. Whether they were aimed down too low or up too high, properly aligning your headlights will maximize your investment and keep you safe.

Lets move on to the how. A Google search of “headlight adjustment” will bring up a ton of information. I have read through a lot of articles and they all point to the same measurements and distances for properly aligning your headlights. I have assembled what I think is a simple guide to do this. Important things to consider before starting this are: Is your gas tank full? Is your trunk (if it’s a car) or bed (if it’s a truck) full of heavy stuff?(groceries, golf clubs, bricks, wood, sand bags, water bottles etc) Are your tires aired up to the correct pressure? It sounds small but remember that if your car or truck is squatting in the front or rear while you align the lights, your lights will be pointing a different direction when you unload this stuff!

The Following guide is for reference only. I am not citing any DOT laws or claiming that this guide abides by any laws that pertain to your local State or Province. I am simply helping you help me, as I find myself continually blinded by headlights that are aimed incorrectly.

This first illustration shows 2 different distances that you can work with. Choose one of these distances for your car to be from a flat vertical surface (a wall). The diagram on the left is the optimal distance for this procedure. If you do not have that much space to work with you can use the diagram on the right.  Keep in mind that your car needs to be square to this surface and on a level area. You can use the side of a building or your garage door as long your car is on a level surface.

Lets start with measuring out the wall. You will need to use some masking tape to mark these measurements out on the wall. You will need to measure the distance from the ground to the center of the headlight assembly. This is your H Line. Use the masking tape to mark these measurements on the wall. Now locate and mark the center of your car on the wall. This is your V Line. Next measure the distance between the center of your car and the headlights. These are your V RH and V LH lines. Every car is different and these measurements must come from your specific car. When you are done with the measuring and taping your wall should end up with a pattern that looks like this illustration. The dark lines represent the masking tape. The V stands for Vertical, the H stands for Horizontal and the RH and LH represent Left Hand Side and Right Hand Side.

Before we get to aiming your lights you will need to locate the adjustment screw. From my personal experience each cars  headlight has a different style of adjuster screw. If you are having a tough time locating your cars adjustment screw consult your vehicle manual. There should be 2 adjustments per headlight. One is for vertical (up and down) adjustments and the other is for horizontal (side to side) adjustments.

Now its time to turn on your lights. Aim your lights one at a time so there is no interference from the other headlight. (you can disconnect the 12 volt power supply to the HID ballast that is not being aimed to turn it off) This illustration is split into the same 2 distances from before. This illustration has measurements listed as guidelines only. Every car is different and these measurement should be used as a reference point only. Not every car has a distinct cut off line like this illustration shows, but you should see something similar. Above the line should be dark, and it should be very bright underneath. Use the adjustment screws to align your lights as close to this as possible. Perform this for both sides of the car and you’re done. Now its time for the test. When it gets dark go for a drive. How are your lights? Are they too low, or too high now? Can you see better? Are people still flashing their lights at you? From here you can make minor tweaks to the adjustments to dial it in perfectly. This illustration shows measurements for high beams as well. Depending on your car you may be able to adjust them separately from the low beams. If your car has separate adjustments than you can adjust your high beams too. All you have to do is add additional V LH and V RH lines for them and adjust them according to the diagram as well.

The main point to focus on while aiming your lights is to keep them pointed no higher then the headlight assemblies. If your car is lowered your lights won’t reach as far. Remember if you aim them up just a little bit it may be fine at 100 ft. but at 1000 ft. they may be pointing at the tops of trees.  If you you have a lifted truck you may need to aim them down a bit to keep from blinding people too. Just keep that in mind and everyone driving towards you will be happy.

On another note, remember what each set of your lights are for. Your low beams are you main source of light. They are designed to illuminate the ground in front of your car and shouldn’t cast light out too far. Your high beam lights allow you to see beyond the reach of your low beams. And fog lights are designed to illuminate the sides of the road and just in front of your car. Think of them as tools to help you see. You wouldn’t use a hammer to drive in a screw would you? Or a screw driver to drive in a nail? So don’t use your fog lights as low beams, or your low beams as high beams, or your high beams as search lights. Use the correct tool for the job!

Thanks for reading. I appreciate any feedback. Feel free to leave a comment or email me directly if you have any concerns or questions regarding this guide. My email is: tech@v-leds.com

James, the tech@v-leds.com

Out of high demand I bring you a simple trouble shooting guide. I answer this question daily: “How do I know if I have a bad ballast or bulb?” I don’t know off the top of my head but I know how to test this in a few easy steps. First and foremost, check all of your connections! Be sure everything is connected properly.

There are only a 3 reasons why your HIDs won’t turn on. They are 1, No Power 2, Bad Ballast, and 3, Bad Bulb. Here is how to tell the what the problem is:

Power: If you just connected your HID kit and they don’t turn on check the power connections. Take note that HID ballasts are polarity sensitive, and are labeled with a small + and – symbol on the power input connector. If you are connecting your HID kit directly to your cars light socket (why risk doing that) the connector may be wired backwards. The Halogen bulbs that you just removed before installing the HID bulbs are NOT polarity sensitive. If you are using an HID Relay Harness be sure to check the ground connections and the battery connections. Ground connections should be free of corrosion and paint. *Note that plastic is not a good source of ground* (try to ground it back to the battery if possible) If the connections check out than you may have a bad relay. Check to see if the relay “clicks” when the lights are turned on. If it does not, check the input connections. If they are good than you could need a new relay.

Ballast or Bulb: If for some reason one of your HID lights stops working refer to the power section above. After you check into the power supply and you verify that there is power and ground at the ballast connections you will now need to check one thing. When you turn on the lights do you hear a buzzing sound from the suspected bad ballast? (this buzzing will last for about 2 seconds and be accompanied by flashes of light from the HID bulb) If this happens you need to try plugging the working ballast from the other side of your car into this side of the car. Does the other working ballast do the same thing? If you answered YES than you have a bad bulb. If you do not hear that buzzing sound than you most likely have a bad ballast.

Hope this helps you diagnose any issues that you may be experiencing. Feel free to email me directly if this does not help. My email is tech@v-leds.com.

James, the tech@v-leds.com

I get asked this question a lot. I will always answer this question with another question that leads into a conversation. I am going to try get all this information out of my head and onto this page. I’ll try not to bore you with math or super detailed information. I just want to cover the basics, so here we go.

First things first, What is the application? What location are you installing the HIDs? Low Beams? High Beams? Fog lights? Replacing a stock DRL? (Daytime Running Light)

In most cases you can just plug the HID Ballast directly into your car or trucks headlight socket. Depending on how your car or truck is wired and if it is equipped automatic light controls you can get different results. I have heard the idea that the headlights pull power directly through the headlight switch itself. The added initial power consumption of HIDs will then, over time, burn out your switch which is expensive to replace. If your car was manufactured pre-1980 you may need to heed this warning. But if you own a newer car it most likely has a dedicated, fused headlight circuit starting at a relay. This also applies to your High Beams and Fog Lights.

Note before that I stated a “Fused Headlight Circuit“. This is why we offer an HID Relay Harness. What amperage is the fuse rated for your light circuit? 10 Amp? 15 Amp? 20 Amp? Every vehicle manufacturer designs the light circuit around a specified wattage of the bulb being powered. If the HIDs draw more power than that bulb you will most likely blow the fuse that is protecting the circuit. Some guys just throw the next size bigger fuse in and it works, is that safe? NO, not really. Consider that the gauge of the wiring used is calculated for the draw of the Halogen bulb you just replaced and for the original size fuse that kept blowing. IF you choose to just up the size of the fuse you may end up with a melted wiring harness! Or worse yet, an electrical FIRE! Instead you should install an HID  Relay Harness. It uses the cars light socket to click over a relay and this allows power to be pulled directly from the battery via sufficient gauge wire and a proper size fuse for HID Ballasts to operate.

Does your car or truck have automatic lights? Does your car use this circuit as a low voltage DRL? If you answered YES to either of these questions I would recommend using an HID Relay Harness.

The “Auto Lights” feature on cars will turn your lights on as soon as you turn the key to the Ignition Position. When you crank the engine over all accessories including your lights will turn off. After the engine starts and you let the key go back to the Ignition position the lights will come back on. This will cause misfires from the voltage dipping when it cuts out. In most cases the Relay Harness will correct this problem.

The “DRL” poses more than one problem. Depending on the operating voltage of the DRL will depict if you need more than just an HID Relay Harness. If you can test the voltage with a test meter and it shows a voltage of 6.5 Volts or greater you can use just the HID Relay Harness. If the voltage is less than 6.5 Volts you can use one of our DRL_MODULES. The DRL_ MODULE is my best friend when it comes to finding a solution for low voltage issues. It is essentially a power booster. It will take as little as 3 Volts and bump it all the way up to 14 Volts! You can install this between the light socket and the input of the Relay Harness and voilà! Now you have enough voltage to click over your HID Relay Harness. A properly installed  HID Relay Harness will fix most problems before you ever experience them. It’s a small price and adds a little extra install time, but I like a little peace of mind.

Thanks for reading, feel free to leave a comment or ask a question. You can contact me via email directly here too: tech@v-leds.com.

~James