Fixing Blinker Hyper Flash

Posted: October 28, 2010 in How to:, Products, Technical, Trouble Shooting
Tags: , , ,

Hello again, I have been receiving a higher volume of emails concerning replacing your blinkers with LEDs. Most of them pertaining to the faster flash rate (Hyper-Flash) that occurs when doing so, and if there is a way to get them to flash at the normal pace again.

This is a very common question. The answer is YES, it can be fixed. Here at V-LEDS we only know the fixes for the cars we have directly worked on ourselves. We log the information so we can help when needed. We still get questions from customers who are either confused by what they may have read on a forum or who are still unsure of what is needed. I hope that I can answer some questions surrounding this issue.

Lets cover why they start Hyper-Flashing in the first place. The answer is safety. Vehicle manufacturers use this feature to let you know when one or more of your blinker bulbs has burned out.

How does the car know? There is a part in the car that controls this. It is called a flasher unit. Each cars flasher unit is designed to monitor the electrical load that it is powering. This basically means that the flasher unit knows how many watts your cars bulbs will draw when they’re on. It monitors the cars circuit as Left and Right, or monitors all 4 bulbs independently. When one of the bulbs is burnt out, removed, or replaced with a lower wattage bulb or LED the flasher does its job and starts Hyper-Flashing on the side of the car that this has occurred.

Correcting Hyper-Flash when you upgrade to V-LEDS is relatively easy once you understand what needs to be done. Lets cover the easiest route first. If you are lucky to own a car that has a replaceable flasher unit than check that first. Where is it? Every car is different. Here is what I do, first I turn on the hazard switch. You will now hear a clicking sound from under your dash board. (*If you don’t hear a clicking, but more of an audible blinker “sound” then your car most likely does not have replaceable flasher unit. That sound will be coming from a small speaker located in the instrument cluster that is controlled by a computer) (*in some cars the flasher unit is built into the HAZARD switch itself, feel the switch. Do you feel it clicking?) After verifying your car does not use either of these flashers, reach up under the dash and start feeling around. The clicking will be accompanied by a tapping that can be felt in the sub frame of the dash.  It will be noticeable but may be hard to locate. If this is the case you may need to remove the lower dash covering to access the flasher unit. The flasher will usually look like the picture above, however there are quite a few variations. Once you locate the flasher unplug it. The hazard lights should stop working, if they continue you have the wrong part. Reinstall it and continue the search.

After you find the flasher unit you need to note how many contacts it has. Some have 2, or 3. Others have 5, or 8. You need to know this so you can compare them to the parts we have listed on our website. Like I mentioned before we really don’t know what part will work in every car, only the cars that we have worked on. So compare yours to what we have available and see if we have a match. Note I said this is the easiest route, even though it sounds like quite the project. That process should take a novice DIY’er about 30-40 minutes to get done. It is fairly easy to do on most cars, and is plug-n-play.

Option 2 requires some tools to get it done. This option is for cars where you cannot replace the flasher or we do not offer a replacement for it. Now that we understand how the flasher unit works we can trick it. The trick is to put the original load back on the flasher unit. We have Load Resistors to allow us to do that.

We have 2 choices of resistors, a 6 OHM and a 3 OHM. Which one do you use? The 6 OHM is the equivalent load of 1 bulb. So if you replace 1 set of bulbs, (the front OR rear bulbs) you will need to install 1 pair of resistors. The 3 OHM is the equivalent load of 2 bulbs.  If you replace all 4 of your bulbs than use 1 set of 3 OHM resistors.

Where do I install them? The resistors need to be installed to the wiring of the bulb at the light socket. We supply splice taps for a painless installation. Below is a video on how these connections work, note my awesome hand modeling skills!

Find a suitable location away from any heat sensitive materials on your car like plastic or wiring harnesses and mount the load resistor. If you are using the 3 OHM load resistors you can make the connection at the front OR rear turn signal wires.

Things to note about this option are: Load Resistors are sold in pairs. One for the Left blinker circuit and one for the Right blinker circuit. Some cars monitor all 4 bulbs separately, if this is the case with your car you will need 2 sets of 6 OHM resistors. Some cars use more than 4 bulbs as blinkers. An example is the new Dodge Challenger. It uses a total of 4 bulbs in the rear and 2 up front. This increases the wattage of the blinker circuit and needs a larger amount of load to correct the Hyper-Flashing. In that car we used 1 set of 3 OHM resistors in the rear and 1 set of 6 OHM resistors  in the front as it monitors all 4 blinker circuits independently too.

I hope this was informative and helpful. If you feel that I left something out or have more questions leave a comment. You can also email me directly here: tech@v-leds.com and  I will answer any other questions that you may have.

Thanks for reading,

James, the tech@v-leds.com

Comments
  1. Roy Yamamoto says:

    Sirs/Madam:

    Why doesn’t someone or a company manufacture L.E.D. turn signal flashers for all the cars.
    It would be much safer then the load resistors and you won’t have to mess around with any wires.

    Thank you,
    Roy Y.

  2. There are a lot of different flasher styles that car manufacturers use. As technology has advanced they are opting out of mechanical parts and replacing them with computer components. Unfortunately these can not be exchanged with off the shelf replacements. Also with the increase in data systems in cars we are experiencing greater difficulties integrating products like lighting with these proprietary systems. We are always testing and experimenting with new concepts that will eventually get us to the next level, but until these advances are proven, load resistors are the method we have available to correct these problems.

    James

  3. Kyle says:

    I have a 1999 Galant. I bought V-LEDS for all four signal bulbs. So I bought a set of the 3ohm load resistors. My front and rear bulbs are 1157. I put the load resistor onto the front left signal, which was the only bulb I had replaced as a LED. I put the resistor to the ground, and a positive wire. It still hyper flashed. I then put it onto the other positive wire. It still hyper flashes. Why is this? Do I need to install all of the LEDs? I would replace my flasher unit, but it is nearly impossible to take out.

  4. Kyle, I would test the wires with a test light to make sure you have the correct wires. Make sure you have a good ground source too. Another thing to check is connection of the splice taps, if your cars wire are smaller gauge the taps may not be cutting through the sheathing all the way.

  5. Kyle says:

    Thanks for the quick and great response! Great customer service! When I get the time here soon I will try this out! Thanks!!

  6. Steven P says:

    Any idea when you will be having the CF18-04 electronic flasher in stock? It has been over 3 weeks and this flasher still has not been replenished 😦